Carbon Monoxide Safety Laws & Legislation by Category

Select a legislation type below to view legislation details by providence or territory.

Carbon Monoxide Legislation Map

Alberta

All residential construction containing fuel-burning appliances or an attached garage must have carbon monoxide alarms installed.

 

British Columbia

Carbon monoxide alarms are required in newly constructed buildings as of 2018. While carbon monoxide alarms are not otherwise mandatory in B.C., it is recommended that alarms be installed if a home has a fuel-burning appliance, fireplace or attached garage.

Vancouver: Carbon monoxide alarms are required in dwellings in the City of Vancouver as of May 2017.

 

Manitoba

Carbon monoxide alarms are mandatory in new homes and other buildings constructed after 2011.

 

New Brunswick

Carbon monoxide alarms are required in any new residential building equipped with fuel-burning appliances or attached garage.

 

Newfoundland and Labrador

Carbon monoxide alarms are required in any new residential building equipped with fuel-burning appliances or attached garage.

 

Nova Scotia

Carbon monoxide alarms are required in any new residential building equipped with fuel-burning appliances or attached garage.

 

Ontario

Carbon monoxide alarms are required in all buildings that include residential occupancies equipped with a fuel-burning appliance, fireplace or garage.

 

Quebec

Carbon monoxide alarms are required in every dwelling that contains a fuel-burning appliance or direct access to an indoor parking structure.

 

Saskatchewan

Carbon monoxide alarms are required in all buildings with sleeping accommodations and either a fuel-burning appliance or an attached garage.

 

Yukon Territory

Carbon monoxide alarms are required in residences equipped with a fuel-burning appliance or an attached garage.

DISCLAIMER: The information provided herein is BRK Brands, Inc.'s summary interpretation. It is only intended to be used as general reference material. It is neither authoritative nor intended to take the place of either the written law or applicable regulations. This should not be construed as an attempt to offer or render legal advice, a legal opinion, or otherwise engage in the practice of law. Check with your providence / territory and local authorities for complete information.